3 Everyday Activities You Do Everyday That Can Improve Your Child’s Expressive Language Skills

by Rachel

in Expressive Language, Miscellaneous

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One of the hardest things about helping your child improve their expressive language skills is getting all the materials you need to work with your child ready to go.

You can teach your child through everyday activities around the house

As a mom of 7, I know that sometimes by the time you find the game, set it up, and get ready to play, it might already time for dinner and baths! That’s why I’m always looking for opportunities to build in learning that don’t require any extra work- just a little bit of mental planning.

In previous posts, I wrote about improving your child’s learning skills at the park, or while shopping with your child. Now I’d like to give you some easy games you can play with your child right at home.

I use these games with my own kids, and teach them to parents just like you. So dig in, and leave a comment below!

1. Help your child learn to state categories of common objects

There are plenty of sorting and categorization games out there. Most of them require that your child sort actual objects, or pictures of objects, according to the correct category.

That’s a great activity, but it’s really just the  beginning. Your child also needs to be able to name the category as well. A lot of children, however, find it difficult to do this with pictures; it’s too abstract.

A better bet: you can teach your child the same thing as you and he clean up his room together. First sweep everything on the floor into a big pile. Then have your child separate everything out into several smaller piles: one for clothing, one for toys, one for books, and one for garbage if need be.

Once your child is about halfway through sorting, you’ll be able to cue him to focus on categories as he puts his things away. For example, when he picks up a sock, say, “Oh, that’s a sock. That’s clothing. Put it with the rest of the clothing.” Gradually as your child picks up other items, you can ask them to tell you what it is – clothing, toys, books, or garbage.

You can do the same thing when you bring  home groceries from the  store. Letting your child help you put everything away will also help her improve her visual memory, as well, since she has to remember where everything goes.

The trick to making this work is to have your child put away most of the items in a category before he starts on another category. That way, when he puts things away, you can remind him “Oh, that’s a vegetable too. Put it with the rest of the vegetables.”

Later when everything’s put away you can point to the vegetable bin and say, “Here’s where we put all the __” letting your child fill in the blank. Do the thing with the other food items: dairy, frozen foods, and so on.

2. Encourage your child to use her descriptive skills by describing lost objects.

How many times has your child lost something, and needed your help to find it? Our usual response is to just go and help our kids find it, or to have them check the last place they had it.

Instead, try asking your child to describe what the object looks like, where it was last, or what they were doing, using more details. So for example, if your child says “I can’t find my flashlight!” Ask your child to tell you more: “What color was it? Can you tell me what it looked like so I can help you find it? Was it small or big?”

Even if you already know what it looks like, you can often feign ignorance with younger children, and get them to explain themselves.

For older children, you can encourage them to talk about what they were doing when they had the missing item, by rephrasing what they’ve said, and saying, “and then what did you do?”

3. Encourage your child to explain why they want something.

It happens probably a dozen times a day or more: your child wants something from you. But whether you plan to give your child the item or not, it’s a good idea to ask your child why. That forces them to use words to express themselves, and helps them attach their feelings to their needs. This is a form of sequencing that’s critical for kids with weak language development.

And by the way, did you notice these are all great activities for improving your child’s sequencing skills?

Would you like to see more activities like this? Let me know in the comments below.


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{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

sandy December 8, 2011 at 5:48 am

Great ideas! Thank you so much. I especially am excited by the sorting/categories activity. My 7yo has a hard time with naming categories and your suggestion allows for a gentle transition into a category they are already working with. Brilliant! I’d love to see more of these type of activities.

Rachel December 8, 2011 at 8:43 am

Glad you find it useful Sandy! I’m planning on putting up some more activities like this over the next few weeks.

Susan Evans December 10, 2011 at 10:58 pm

I like the idea of having the child sort things into piles in his bedroom. This is a great way of organizing and cleaning a bedroom, too. In a playroom, if the child had a bin for each kind of toy, for example, he could run around the room picking up Legos to put in the Lego bin, then marbles to put in the marbles bin, etc.

Rachel December 10, 2011 at 11:33 pm

Ha, now you know my secret…

Jenn @therebelchick December 11, 2011 at 7:31 am

These are all fantastic ideas, thanks for sharing! :)

Rachel December 11, 2011 at 10:52 am

Thanks for stopping by Jenn!

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